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Press Release Details

Hampton Beach Development Earns Planning, Design Honors

(Concord, NH – April 10, 2013) – The redevelopment of Hampton Beach State Park has been recognized by two New Hampshire organizations for its design and architecture. Featuring new bathhouses, a revitalized boardwalk and the signature Seashell Complex, Hampton Beach State Park now offers modern facilities for the tens of thousands of visitors to the Seacoast.

“But more than that, this project has revitalized a stretch of New Hampshire’s coastline that’s a part of summer memories for people far beyond the Granite State,” said Department of Resources and Economic Development Commissioner Jeffrey Rose. “It is also a great example of the power of strong partnerships between government agencies and community partners working together to accomplish great things.”

Work began on the $14.5 million project, designed by Samyn-D'Elia Architects of Ashland, in 2010 and was completed in 2012. On April 3, the Plan NH honored the state park with its merit award, citing the Seashell Complex for its stage, meeting space, restrooms, as well as the new pavilions and boardwalk that can accommodate pedestrians, bicycles and wheelchairs

Earlier this year, the New Hampshire chapter of the American Institute of Architects honored Hampton Beach State Park with merit awards for design excellence and a People’s Choice award, based on voting at the organization’s website.
          
“The jury was unanimous that this was an astounding accomplishment for Hampton Beach given the economic and political challenges associated with a public project of this scale,” according to the organization.
          
“This was the largest single project DRED has ever undertaken and was completed because a lot of organizations came together to make it happen,” said Philip Bryce, director of the Division of Parks and Recreation.